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BornSinner

How to: Install Mesh in Fairings

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This How-To came from NraGed on the 600rr forum. I do something like this to the "ShopBike". The material that I used was way thinner and not as strong. So go chance this will be done on something over the winter

DIFFICULTY = 6 OUT OF 10

Before:

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Step 1....

Buy a mesh garbage can from either Walmart or Ikea for $7.00. They have a choice of Black, Silver or Dark Gray.

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Step 2....

Cut the garbage can into a usable sheet of mesh, but do not kink or straighten it out. Leave the curl in it, as I found it helped with the fitting later. You will have extra if needed...I used a little over half the mesh only for one bike.

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Step 3....

Remove your fairings and place on a soft working surface that won't scratch. There are many threads on how to get the fairings off your 600RR.

Step 4....

Note the foam insulation on the insides of the fairings. This foam will need to be trimmed using a razor blade and scraper. I used an automotive "brake cleaner" to remove the adhesive residue after the foam was peeled off

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Step 5....

Next you must cut the mesh into workable sizes. A good couple inches bigger than the opening you are filling is sufficient. Remember to use the garbage can's natural bends to find the best fit. Using a Sharpie, without marking the mesh on the outside where it is visable, mark your cuts. Keep in mind that corners need to be bent in separate ways, so mark your cuts accordingly (i.e. - see picture)

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Step 5b....

***added note***

You'll notice one side (LH) is an odd shaped hole and you will need to really think before you cut the mesh. Plan your cuts and be sure not to apply Sharpie marks where you will see them later. As they say..."Measure twice, cut once"?

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Step 6....

Cut your pieces using a pair of Tin Snips. I am not sure how everyday wire cutters will work, but I know Snips are the quick, easy, precise way to cut the mesh.

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Step 7....

Fit your newly cut pieces of mesh onto the matching holes and perform bends as per your original markings. I found the mesh bent in very straight lines and was exceptionally easy to mold into place.

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Step 7b....

***added note***

I used a very small hammer to help mold the odd shaped LH fairing hole. The mesh was easily molded into place while I held the mesh firmly and worked it gently around the bends with the hammer. I only needed the hammer on the odd shaped hole. This is not a big deal and is not very difficult to do.....only patience is needed.

Step 8....

Remove the now "prefit" mesh pieces and apply a thin bead of RTV silicone to the inside of the fairing, around the holes. Keep the bead of silicone as far away from the opening as possible, while still close enough to bond the cut mesh pieces to the plastics. This is because you are going to squish the silicone later and you don't want it to be visable through the fairing holes. Do one hole at a time.

***added note*** -some members are using a 2 part epoxy instead of RTV silicone. Both will hold, but RTV is not permanent....Epoxy is....so choose something you can live with. If RTV is used, you will have to be generous to ensure reliable stick for extended life. I used one small tube of RTV on each side of the bike. RTV silicone should not come off, and I know the original "how to" thread included the use of RTV too!

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Step 9....

Refit your mesh cutouts to the matching holes and allow the mesh to squish into the silicone. Be sure not to get any silicone onto the visable mesh surface. I used gloves and a small scraper to assist in slightly spreading the silicone around.

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Step 10....

If using RTV silicone istead of Epoxy....add additional RTV silicone and spread it around as in previous step. I did not want to reattach my mesh at a later time. NOW is the time to ensure it "Ain't coming off".

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Step 11....

Once the mesh is completely installed, us a heavy object to weigh it down. This will keep the mesh tight against the plastics while silicone drys. Be sure to not get any Silicone or epoxy on the mesh area as a result of screwing around with something heavy? I used hammers against my workbench.

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Step 12....

Reattach plastics to bike and ta-da....

AFTER...

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That looks pretty cool. I just need a bike with faring now.

oo oo, where are they keys to my wifes bike.................

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you don't have ot buy a trashcan to get the metal, they sell it at lowes or home depot. looks just like it.

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you don't have ot buy a trashcan to get the metal, they sell it at lowes or home depot. looks just like it.

The trash can is usually cheaper than just buying the mesh.

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I would be interested to see how well it holds up to the elements..

I bet rust loves that thing.

The mesh is usually electro-statically painted. No rust.

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flounder i think that you are right about the rust, the stuff i am talking about is just stainless, exposed metal. that is why they went with the trash can. good point satan

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The mesh is usually electro-statically painted. No rust.

In other words.. Powder coated...

There you go trying to sound all edumacated and stuff..:D

Did any of you happen to see the news the other morning.. The stupid reporter lady tried the same thing.. She said the following while referring to a salt truck driving by.

"There goes one of the trucks now putting down the Sodium Chloride to help melt the ice."

She made herself sound like such a dumb ass by saying that instead of just saying SALT...

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The mesh is usually electro-statically painted. No rust.

In other words.. Powder coated...

There you go trying to sound all edumacated and stuff..:D

If it gets hit with a stone and chips, it will still rust though..

Did any of you happen to see the news the other morning.. The stupid reporter lady tried the same thing.. She said the following while referring to a salt truck driving by.

"There goes one of the trucks now putting down the Sodium Chloride to help melt the ice."

She made herself sound like such a dumb ass by saying that instead of just saying SALT...

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In other words.. Powder coated...

There you go trying to sound all edumacated and stuff..:D

Did any of you happen to see the news the other morning.. The stupid reporter lady tried the same thing.. She said the following while referring to a salt truck driving by.

"There goes one of the trucks now putting down the Sodium Chloride to help melt the ice."

She made herself sound like such a dumb ass by saying that instead of just saying SALT...

Actually, no. But thanks for playing. Electro-static paint is used for things like metal poles, school lockers, etc. A positive charge is applied to the metal. The paint is negatively charged. The paint wraps around the metal like a magnet. No over-spray, and all of the metal is covered uniformly.

Powder coating is similar, but involves baking.

Any of you guys/gals catch when Flounder tried to act smarter than he actually was? Fucking hilarious.

My dad used to own a painting company. I painted school lockers as a summer job. Electro-static paint is freaking awesome.

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I would be interested to see how well it holds up to the elements..

I bet rust loves that thing.

Flounder

i made these mesh covers on the "ShopBike" and they didnt rust and its been 2 years. "I must have got lucky":lol:

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Actually, no. But thanks for playing. Electro-static paint is used for things like metal poles, school lockers, etc. A positive charge is applied to the metal. The paint is negatively charged. The paint wraps around the metal like a magnet. No over-spray, and all of the metal is covered uniformly.

Powder coating is similar, but involves baking.

Any of you guys/gals catch when Flounder tried to act smarter than he actually was? Fucking hilarious.

My dad used to own a painting company. I painted school lockers as a summer job. Electro-static paint is freaking awesome.

I second that. I've dealt with different paint specs and toured many-a-facility that makes parts for the auto company I work for (Tier 1 supplier). Powder-coat and e-coat are two different processes. Coincidentally, either of them pass our 96-hour salt fog testing.

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hey flounder how bout you quit double posting your responses. thanks

he wants to make sure you REALLY get it.

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