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New track bike

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I've been holding off on putting the track fairings on the R1 as well, as I have the same suspicion that you do about a delayed start to the track season. Hoping for some nice days over the next few weeks for a SEO trip or 2 so I can get some miles on the bike and start to get to know it.

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On 12/31/2019 at 5:21 PM, durk said:

Step 5 - strategically back truck into garage so you have the right amount of clearance to place those wonderfully crafted padded 4x4s under the hitch so you can place your bead breaker and bar on your tire

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Step 6 - use tire irons to remove tire

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Step 7 - lube up new tire with soapy water and install using tire irons 

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 step 8 - take tire and 4x4s back to sturdy card table, reinsert core, air tire up to pressure, be sure bead sets, reinstall rotors

step 9 - install tire back on the bike and lower it back to the ground, ready to go riding 

ub3trga.jpg

Warning - step 5 requires a hillbilly engineering  degree 

You don't have issues not balancing the tire?

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50 minutes ago, Jared said:

You don't have issues not balancing the tire?

I had an issue 1 time with a ContiMotion front tire. I believe that was the tire itself. The rest of the time, no issues on the street or track. I tried it because I read where a lot of guys never balanced there tires. I typically mount a new set, give them a test run up to triple digits and call it good. 

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7 minutes ago, durk said:

I had an issue 1 time with a ContiMotion front tire. I believe that was the tire itself. The rest of the time, no issues on the street or track. I tried it because I read where a lot of guys never balanced there tires. I typically mount a new set, give them a test run up to triple digits and call it good. 

Nice, maybe I'll start doing this! (With some actual tire change tools, don't have a truck and all the tools shown here haha)

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1 hour ago, Jared said:

You don't have issues not balancing the tire?

 

10 minutes ago, durk said:

I had an issue 1 time with a ContiMotion front tire. I believe that was the tire itself. The rest of the time, no issues on the street or track. I tried it because I read where a lot of guys never balanced there tires. I typically mount a new set, give them a test run up to triple digits and call it good. 

 

2 minutes ago, Jared said:

Nice, maybe I'll start doing this! (With some actual tire change tools, don't have a truck and all the tools shown here haha)

Always balance tires but the only ones I find hard to balance are Michelin. Not because they are bad because Michelin thinks their tires are perfectly balanced and the don't give you a mark to where the light spot is(yellow dot) They are wrong so it's trial and error to find that sometimes. Most tires require very little tweeking maybe a 1/8-1/4 oz. Those small differences you will never feel at road speeds.  

Hey @Jared ive got a tire changer and fully stock garage with lift. You need any help let me know. Can always ship tires or parts to my place and ride up to knock it out. 

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1 hour ago, 2talltim said:

 

 

Always balance tires but the only ones I find hard to balance are Michelin. Not because they are bad because Michelin thinks their tires are perfectly balanced and the don't give you a mark to where the light spot is(yellow dot) They are wrong so it's trial and error to find that sometimes. Most tires require very little tweeking maybe a 1/8-1/4 oz. Those small differences you will never feel at road speeds.  

Hey @Jared ive got a tire changer and fully stock garage with lift. You need any help let me know. Can always ship tires or parts to my place and ride up to knock it out. 

Wow, awesome! That would be great, I've had two sets of tires changed and wished I could do it myself both times. This last time, the shop damaged the paint on the back rim, too. I got Roadsmart 3s, so should be good for this year at least :)

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9 minutes ago, Jared said:

 I got Roadsmart 3s, so should be good for this year at least :)

Last set of Roadsmart 3's I had on the bike only lasted 13 days :lol:.............and 6800 miles :D  

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25 minutes ago, 2talltim said:

Last set of Roadsmart 3's I had on the bike only lasted 13 days :lol:.............and 6800 miles :D  

Holy crap, that's 6 months of car travel for me 😂

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42 minutes ago, Jared said:

Holy crap, that's 6 months of car travel for me 😂

Epic trip a couple years ago can't wait to another one like it...see pics here. 

https://ohioriders.net/index.php?/topic/113267-go-west-young-man-justin-and-tims-westward-adventure-pictures-and-ride-reports/&

 

Edited by 2talltim

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47 minutes ago, 2talltim said:

Epic trip a couple years ago can't wait to another one like it...see pics here. 

https://ohioriders.net/index.php?/topic/113267-go-west-young-man-justin-and-tims-westward-adventure-pictures-and-ride-reports/&

 

Looks like quite the adventure! Nice bikes! My wife and I plan on taking a van we're working on to see all the states as soon as the travel restrictions are lifted. Probably take the bike on a hitch mount.

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It’s super easy to balance. Buy a trueing stand and the heavy side will rotate to the bottom. Slap some weight on the opposite side and check again. It’s an art to learn how much weight is needed. When done slap some black duct tape over the weights. Same way we’ve done it at the racetrack. 
 

if you do decide to sell your street stuff, I may be interested. 

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On 6/27/2020 at 7:11 AM, DesmoDuc said:

any track updates on this project?

Yes, I worked with GPR yo get them to make a fit kit for the Attack Performance triple clamp with the GSG steering stop. It looks like a tumor sticking up from the stem but I kindof like it.
 

I took the body work back off and installed the track fairings. First track day was June 9th and it was great. The bike doesn’t have any more speed than my 600rr but it gets up to speed quicker and turns much sharper. My body position was absolute crap the entire time partly because I am out of practice and partly because I installed some really sticky tank grips. When I lean into a turn, my leg is absolutely glued to the tank, no chance for adjusting without making a major movement of my lower body. I like some grip but I also like to be able to lean more if I need and you just can’t do that with these grips. 

4FFFEA13-9C63-4806-B23C-DA2CF28C5679.jpeg

 

Edited by TMC Customs

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37 minutes ago, TMC Customs said:

Yes, I worked with GPR yo get them to make a fit kit for the Attack Performance triple clamp with the GSG steering stop. It looks like a tumor sticking up from the stem but I kindof like it.
 

I took the body work back off and installed the track fairings. First track day was June 9th and it was great. The bike doesn’t have any more speed than my 600rr but it gets up to speed quicker and turns much sharper. My body position was absolute crap the entire time partly because I am out of practice and partly because I installed some really sticky tank grips. When I lean into a turn, my leg is absolutely glued to the tank, no chance for adjusting without making a major movement of my lower body. I like some grip but I also like to be able to lean more if I need and you just can’t do that with these grips. 

 

The 675 has more low end grunt and doesn't require you to be constantly ringing it's neck for power. More forgiving if you aren't quite in the right gear for a particular corner - you can still get good drive. The 675 is definitely a look where you want to go kind of bike - super agile. You've got a lot of fork tube showing. I (and a lot of other's that run 675's) run them nearly flush with the triple.

You just need to adjust your body position and your movements side-to-side to account for you not being able to move your leg's once you've turned in. Make sure you aren't riding with your balls completely against the tank. You want about a fist's worth of space there so you can easily go side to side without having to rotate your hips which is extra movement which isn't needed. You should be pretty much set up body position wise before turn in and not making major lower body position changes once turned in. Need to set up for the turn and have that asscheek off the side of the seat ideally before the braking zone so all you need to do at tip in is pretty much put that input on the bars and tip in. I'm rarely ever in the center of the seat - even on a straight away - I'm nearly always set up for the next corner. Less movement on tip in means less that can upset the bike on tip in and less to think about - you can concentrate modulating the brakes until you find your desired direction (get the bike pointed for exit). After you've got direction you can start standing her up again and getting back on the gas. 

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6 hours ago, TimTheAzn said:

The 675 has more low end grunt and doesn't require you to be constantly ringing it's neck for power. More forgiving if you aren't quite in the right gear for a particular corner - you can still get good drive. The 675 is definitely a look where you want to go kind of bike - super agile. You've got a lot of fork tube showing. I (and a lot of other's that run 675's) run them nearly flush with the triple.

You just need to adjust your body position and your movements side-to-side to account for you not being able to move your leg's once you've turned in. Make sure you aren't riding with your balls completely against the tank. You want about a fist's worth of space there so you can easily go side to side without having to rotate your hips which is extra movement which isn't needed. You should be pretty much set up body position wise before turn in and not making major lower body position changes once turned in. Need to set up for the turn and have that asscheek off the side of the seat ideally before the braking zone so all you need to do at tip in is pretty much put that input on the bars and tip in. I'm rarely ever in the center of the seat - even on a straight away - I'm nearly always set up for the next corner. Less movement on tip in means less that can upset the bike on tip in and less to think about - you can concentrate modulating the brakes until you find your desired direction (get the bike pointed for exit). After you've got direction you can start standing her up again and getting back on the gas. 

I think most people run them flush with a stock setup but the attack triples have a different offset. With that and the attack bottom link, the geometry changes a good bit. 
 

You are definitely right about preparing for the turn early, that is something I need to work on. I just like to pick the bike up and keep my body low coming out of turns and that usually involves me moving  my knee on the tank a bit. I’m just going to have to get better at setting up my position correctly the first time and not adjusting. 

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