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modular

Slow Clutch Engagement

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This is a cable operated wet clutch. Bike is new with @600 miles on it. I have tried a few times to get the clutch adjusted right to rid the bike of this but it persists. Clutch is fine in all other scenarios EXCEPT when shifting at high rpm's. Since new the clutch lever has always engaged the clutch very far out in the lever stroke. OEM clutch not spec'd good enough? Am I missing something? 

Edited by modular

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Adjust at the case first. Fine tune at the pirtch. 

If is feels that it is engaging too late, then let it out at the case, then take up the slack at the pirtch. 

If this doesn’t help, take it back tot he dealer if it has warranty.

If no warranty, then your pulling the clutch and measuring the stack and plates. 

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Thank you for the feedback. I will try this. The bike is new and very much under warranty but if I can fine tune the clutch I most certainly will. My next choice will be getting the Barnett clutch that has Kevlar plates and 15% stiffer springs.

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If the plates are in spec, the springs will just make for better engagement. If this is your daily driver, I wouldn’t recommend stiffer springs. It will just make a harder pull. 

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New bike, new clutch. No point in replacing new components. Stiffer springs are also not needed. Sounds like as previously mentioned you need to adjust properly. Find factory spec for lever free play, it's usually 5mm or so. You should be able to shift without the clutch at high rpm, just put very little pressure on the shifter, chop the throttle briefly and pop it up a gear and get back on the gas. If you can do this with no problem, I'd take a closer look at clutch cable adjustment. If you can't do this, the issue is with your transmission or your coordination.

 

 

Also helps to know what bike you're talking about.

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8 hours ago, CrazySkullCrusher said:

You should be able to shift without the clutch at high rpm, just put very little pressure on the shifter, chop the throttle briefly and pop it up a gear and get back on the gas.

I was going to try this as well. 

 

Also helps to know what bike you're talking about.

This is the XG750A.

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8 hours ago, CrazySkullCrusher said:

You should be able to shift without the clutch at high rpm, just put very little pressure on the shifter, chop the throttle briefly and pop it up a gear and get back on the gas.

I was actually going to try this.

Bike in question is the H-D XG750A Street Rod.

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Built here, all be it in the plant they are closing.

Edited by modular

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Just the the rest of H-D's (or most manufacturers) parts are sourced from all over the globe. Not sure why that matters. 

tcs_zps5yphbvk8.gif

 

 

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I am adjusting the clutch and will ride this weekend. 

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Thank you for the tip Travisty. Worked like a charm. I mean, it feels like a new bike even lofting the front wheel at times. :D Gonna hit 10 and 22 tomorrow now that I have the tires broken in and the new suspension dialed in. 

IMG_0700_zpsaqq13wd6.jpg

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Just got back from Falmouth. Granted, I have had to put some money into the tires, brakes (pads) and suspension but this bike is a very competent corner carver. Better than the XR1200 I have in the grarage (no head shake coming out of corners) and close to my SV1KS. The profile and traction of the Dunlop Q3S's is far superior to the OEM Michelin's is almost laughable. The bike drops into a corner so much quicker and I can power out of corners with ease. I was able to get the rear to step out on one sharp right hand corner but it gathered itself up quickly and lofted the front wheel. The EBC brake pads are great at threshold braking giving lots of feedback to the point of almost unweighting the rear. The Ohlins cartridges and Hagon shocks, now all dialed in, are great. I ended up adding one more click of rebound/compression damping on the rears and it just rails, Yes, this is a Harley. No, it's not supposed to handle nor be "fast". Huh.    

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